“Todos los Católicos, son Católicos de Cafetería”, dice un sacerdote Jesuita. ¿Es ésto algo positivo?

(Abajo está la traducción de  “All Catholics are cafeteria Catholics” says Jesuit priest. Is this a good thing?” on this website.)

Quizá el Padre Thomas Reese, editor del National Catholic Reporter, está en lo cierto cuando él dice: “Bienvenidos a la Cafetería”, metafóricamente hablando de la unidad en el Catolicismo. Y él lo explica de la siguiente manera…

“La verdad es que todos los católicos, son católicos de cafetería. Los católicos conservadores estuvieron dispuestos a ignorar las fuertes declaraciones sobre la justicia y la paz, pronunciadas por los Papas Juan Pablo y Benedicto y están gustosamente dispuestos a ignorar la oposición del Papa Francisco a la ordenación de mujeres.

Si esto es el Catolicismo de Cafetería no hay duda de que continuará obstaculizando, -durante muchas generaciones- el cambio en la Iglesia Católica. Es decir, que la Iglesia Católica continuará siendo una gran e infeliz familia discutiendo y argumentando de una posición a otra, mientras decidimos sobre que pelear y cuales temas ignorar, sean de Liturgia, Justicia, Paz o la ordenación de las mujeres, etc. etc.

Si es así como se va a proceder, ¿qué ocurrirá con la reforma profunda de la Iglesia Católica propuesta por el Concilio Vaticano II… más allá de su enfoque pastoral y misericordioso? ¿Morirá a causa de una benigna negligencia o por miedo a causar un cisma?

El Padre Reese dice: “Los católicos necesitan, crecer, madurar y aprender a vivir en una Iglesia en la que se discute, se argumenta, pero no debemos permitir que los desacuerdos separen a la familia. Necesitamos entender que las personas tienen puntos de vista diferentes y que podemos aprender unos de otros a través del diálogo. En lugar de dividirnos en facciones partidarias, necesitamos definir lo que significa para nosotros ser comunidad.

Sí, “somos familia”! Pero una familia no puede crecer si no se respetan las diferencias, y se permiten unos a otros el espacio para crecer diferentes… ¿Y qué sucede si algunos miembros de la familia están en contra de las diferencias, en contra del cambio, en contra del diálogo? ¿Deben los otros miembros de la familia inclinarse sumisos… con la esperanza de que antes, o muchos años después de su muerte, algo cambie? Nosotras pensamos que NO!

En 2015, el Cardenal Walter Kasper escribió un artículo en “ORIGINS”: “El Vaticano II va hacia una “Multifacética Unidad”(Vol.45. num.9). El escribió sobre la necesidad de una unidad en la diversidad, si es que queremos un progreso en el Ecumenismo   . Nosotras sugerimos que ya es tiempo de MIRAR HACIA ADENTRO de nuestra Iglesia, para ver las posibilidades de una “multifacética unidad”, porque el estilo cafetería, no le está sirviendo a ninguno de los dos lados de la Iglesia. El estilo cafetería no representa un reto para el crecimiento de ambos lados.

Nosotras decimos NO al estilo cafetería y SI a una “Unidad Multifacética”

Link artículo Padre Reese: https://ncronline.org/news/opinion/more-catholic-pope

(Nuestra más profunda gratitud a Luisa Maria Rivera por su fina traducción profesional de este artículo.)

 

 

Can the Church Dialogue Its Differences into Unity?

A conversation with Paula Ruddy in regard to her comments to our post,  Church Unity: NOT about merging disparate factions, on this website.

Paula Ruddy:

“I can see the intention for this, empathize with it. However, I think there is another way to unity through dialogue among people of different worldviews.  

The postmodern cultural view that all are equally valid ways of viewing “reality” supports this strategy for unity, but is it true that Vatican II can be interpreted both as true to the Gospel in opening to the world and as not true to the Gospel in opening to the world? Isn’t there some objectivity in what the Gospel teaches and how the Church should exist in the world?”

Sisters Lea and Consilia reply: 

Yes, there have always been different ways of viewing “reality” with every view claiming its own view as valid, even superior to the other’s view of reality. 

The problem within the Catholic Church begins when two or more worldviews diverge so radically that they no longer see the Gospel through the same “objectivity” lens.   This is the case of the different Gospel views between Opus Dei/ Evangelical Catholicism AND Post-Vatican II understandings of the Gospel.  In other countries, the problem is that cultural adaptation to the Gospel is thwarted by “one way only” interpretations of Catholic doctrine and practive.

Pope Benedict may have correctly described the two interpretations of Vatican II as continuity and rupture…continuity with the Council of Trent and rupture as break.  However, one might interpret his words differently…as meaning continuity with Church Tradition AND rupture…NOT break or Schism as Pope Benedict implied…but rupture into a new shoot, an evolutionary outgrowth from the Root of Jesse.

Paula Ruddy:

“What about the Petrine Ministry to lead in the Gospel direction? Should the Pope say ‘all interpretations of Vatican II are valid’?”

Sisters Lea and Consilia reply: 

Insofar as any interpretation of Vatican II can be supported by Vatican II documents or post-Vatican II theology, it would seem the pope ought to consider those interpretations valid.  

Of course, this has not been the case with the two popes preceding Pope Francis.  For many Catholics today, including George Weigel, the interpretation of Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI are the ONLY authorized interpretations of Vatican II.

As for the Petrine Ministry of the Pope to lead and unify the Church in the Gospel direction, perhaps the papal ministry for the future lies in coordinating/negotiating the differing Gospel interpretations within a shared Papal/People of God relationship… a negotiating servant-leadership for a challenging multifaceted set of Gospel interpretations. For example, the 20+ Eastern Catholic Rites/Churches in union with Rome, the Opus Dei prelature, and the Anglican ordinariate are but a few examples of this negotiating servant-leadership.

Paula Ruddy:

“The question I have about dividing us up is this: Is it good to abandon the mainstream Church to the point of view that the Holy Spirit is NOT IN the world while establishing an ordinariate that believes the Gospel calls for discerning the Holy Spirit and the Kingdom of God WITHIN the world as it is?”

Sisters Lea and Consilia reply: 

The questions we have here are these:  What is “mainstream Church” Catholicism?  The majority viewpoint?  The viewpoint of the presiding pontiff? 

Is there any point of view within the various Catholic Rites/Churches, prelature, or ordinariates that teaches “the Holy Spirit is NOT in the world”?  Perhaps the answer is “yes” when we consider post-Trent Church vs. world theology where the Holy Spirit resides only in the One True Catholic Church.  The Second Ecumenical Council pushed back on this view of Church and  world.  Is this theological viewpoint what is “dividing us up” along with the scientific revolution, the loss of leadership credibility, clericalism, and marginalization of women, divorced Catholics, LGBTQ+, etc? 

Paula Ruddy:

“Isn’t it better to continue the dialogue among people with evolving worldviews within the Church, depending on the Holy Spirit, faith and reason to keep us together?”

Sisters Lea and Consilia reply: 

Indeed, it is ALWAYS better to continue dialogue within the Church.  When there is radical divergence in theological interpretation, however, dialogue becomes much more difficult, if not impossible. 

Throw inequality of relationship into the mix, as Leonard Swidler discusses in his Dialogue Decalogue and dialogue actually becomes impossible.  One has to ask if even the Holy Spirit is impeded from holding us together if we cannot treat each other as the sisters and brothers that Jesus called us to be.  

Paula Ruddy:

Do the believers in the rightness of Vatican II have brave spokespeople who can make the vision clear and compelling to the mainstream Roman Rite Catholic? If not, how are they going to run an ordinariate?

Sisters Lea and Consilia reply: 

One has to wonder if it is necessary “to make the vision clear and compelling to the mainstream Roman Rite Catholic.”  If the goal is to win mainstream Catholicism back from the decades of spiritual groundwork done by Evangelicial Catholicism (and its precursor, the Opus Dei Movement/Prelature), that ship has left the harbor.

What we see as possible and URGENT is the redirection of energy spent by those who stand continually waiting in the vestibule of Roman Rite Catholicism, begging and hoping that someday Vatican II will rise again…if only we are patient enough.

If the Apostles never came out of the Upper Room, there would be no Catholic Church today.  What were they waiting for?  Approval by the Temple High Priest?

 

As for “brave spokespeople” of the great Second Ecumenical Vatican Council, we have many both in this life and in the hereafter.  Fortunately, those who have left us in this life have also left their writings for us to study and discern the earliest spirit and wisdom of Vatican II. 

As for how a Vatican II prelature or a Vatican II ordinariate might operate, we do have models today within the Church, models which might be adjusted and applied both to different national cultures and different evolving understandings of a Post-Vatican II Church in an ever-changing world.  As in every institutional model, what the model presents is always ONLY a model.

Paula Ruddy:

“I appreciate the “Rite Beyond Rome” effort to discern how we should proceed. I hope we keep talking.”

Sisters Lea and Consilia reply: 

We appreciate your efforts and the efforts of all those working to discern how we should proceed in moving forward.  We intend to explore the prelature, ordinariate models here on https://RiteBeyondRome.com as precursor to a Post-Vatican II Rite/Church in union with Rome, if that is where the Wisdom Spirit of God leads.

And YES, let’s keep talking!

https://RiteBeyondRome.com

Diferencias teológicas entre los ritos católicos?

(Abajo está la traducción de  Theological Differences between Catholic Rites on this website.)

Este texto es un extracto de: Doctrina/ De Oriente a Occidente.
(
Vea la dirección de Internet abajo.)

¿Es verdad que en las Iglesias Católicas Orientales se permite tener expresiones teológicas (puntos de vista teológicos) diferentes? y si esto es así, ¿qué implica?

No hay duda que esto es cierto. En las Iglesias Católicas Orientales no solo está permitido diferir, sino que son animados activamente, a cultivar sus muy propias expresiones teológicas. Los católicos orientales, aunque íntegramente católicos, y en comunión con el Papa, difieren en varios aspectos, además de en lo litúrgico. Nosotros también tenemos una tradición espiritual única, así como un enfoque teológico único.

Aunque estamos de acuerdo en lo fundamental de la doctrina, nosotros enfocamos la doctrina de una forma muy diferente – desde la perspectiva de Oriente. Mientras que la Iglesia Occidental, tradicionalmente ha formulado su doctrina en los términos de la Escolástica Teológica Latina, nosotros nos apoyamos casi exclusivamente, en la Teología de los Padres de la Iglesia Oriental. Y en lugar de que esta diferencia rompa la unidad de la Iglesia, expresa con mayor claridad, la verdadera UNIVERSALIDAD, de la Iglesia de Cristo.

Esto fue proclamado, -con autoridad- por el II Concilio Vaticano:

“Todos en la Iglesia deben preservar la unidad en lo esencial. Pero también que todos, de acuerdo a los dones que han recibido, gocen de una apropiada libertad en las variadas formas de vida espiritual y disciplina, en sus ritos litúrgicos diferentes, y aún en sus elaboraciones teológicas de la verdad revelada.” UNITATIS REDINTEGRATIO, num.4

Hasta aquí el extracto de: Doctrina/ De Oriente a Occidente

Ciertamente el Opus Dei, siendo la primera prelatura Romana, aprobada por el Vaticano, tiene perspectivas teológicas diferentes del Vaticano II, de las tradicionales de la Teología de la Iglesia del Rito Romano

Dado lo anterior es perfectamente razonable, que un Rito/Iglesia Vaticano II, con sus perspectivas teológicas diferentes, pueda co-existir, con los otros 22 Ritos/Iglesias no Romanas, en unión con Roma.

(Nuestra más profunda gratitud a Luisa Maria Rivera por su fina traducción profesional de este artículo.)

Nuestro Comentario sobre “Únete al trabajo de Transformación” publicado por el National Catholic Reporter (NCR)

(Abajo está la traducción de  Our comment on “Join the work of transformation” posted on National Catholic Reporter on this website.)

Una forma a través de la cual podemos unirnos al trabajo de transformación de nuestra Iglesia y de nuestro país, es ver, con toda claridad, como la actual forma de gobierno de los Estados Unidos, se asemeja en su modus operandi, a las dictaduras de América del Sur, cuyos dictadores fueron entrenados por los Estados Unidos, en la Escuela de las Américas.

William Cavanaugh tiene la experiencia de primera mano con la Iglesia de Chile, durante la dictadura del Gral. Pinochet (1973-1990), cuyo régimen Cavanaugh lo describe como dedicado a avivar las llamas de la confusión y el desorden a través de:

  • Fragmentar y romper el orden que se preveía y esperaba
  • Desacreditar a personas y el análisis que ellas hacían de lo que estaba sucediendo
  • Crear caos para propiciar la necesidad de orden (un orden que quería decir eliminar a la disidencia).
  • El arte estratégico de crear una situación anómala, en la que la gente se vuelve víctima del miedo y la ansiedad.

¿Nos suena conocido algo de lo anterior? ¿Lo sienten como algo que han experimentado?

Pero, ¡claro está¡ algo similar a una dictadura, jamás podría suceder en USA.

Las citas anteriores han sido tomadas del libro TORTURA Y EUCARISTÍA de William Cavanaugh. El capítulo 2 de este libro, “La Iglesia aprende a vivir oprimida” probablemente nos enseñaría algo a todos.

Sobre este tema continuaremos hablando.
https://RiteBeyondRome.com

(Nuestra más profunda gratitud a Luisa Maria Rivera por su fina traducción profesional de este artículo.)

“All Catholics are cafeteria Catholics” says Jesuit priest. Is this a good thing?

Maybe Fr. Thomas Reese, editor of National Catholic Reporter, is right when he says, “Welcome to the cafeteria” as a way of expressing Catholic unity.  He explains why…

“The truth is all Catholics are cafeteria Catholics. Conservative Catholics were quite willing to ignore John Paul’s and Benedict’s strong statements on justice and peace, and progressive Catholics are happy to ignore Francis’ opposition to women priests.”

If this is cafeteria Catholicism, then certainly it will continue to obstruct change in the Catholic Church for generations to come. Thus the Catholic Church will remain one big unhappy family adamantly arguing back and forth as we decide what to fight and what to ignore about liturgy, justice and peace, and opposition to women priests, etc, etc.

So what happens to deep Vatican II reform of the Catholic Church…beyond even its pastoral and merciful approach?  Does it simply die of benign neglect or fear of causing schism?

Fr. Reese says, “Catholics need to grow up and learn to live in a church where arguments take place, but we should not let disagreements break up the family. We need to understand that people have different viewpoints and that we can learn from one another by having dialogue. Rather than dividing into partisan factions, we need to model what it means to be a community.”

Yes, “WE ARE Family!”   But family cannot grow if it cannot respect each other’s differences and allow one another the space to grow differently.  And what if certain members of the family are against differences, against change and against dialog?  Do the other family members just bow their heads in submission…in hope that something someday will change before or long after they die?   We think NOT!

In 2015, Cardinal Walter Kasper wrote an article in ORIGINS “Vatican II: Toward a Multifaceted Unity”. (Vol 45, #9). He wrote about the unity in diversity needed if we are to make any further progress in ecumenical endeavors. We suggest it is time to look WITHIN our Church to see the possibilities for a “multifaceted unity” because cafeteria style is definitely NOT working for either side of the Church.  Pick&Choose cafeteria-style offers no challenge for growth on either side.

We say, “NO” to Cafeteria Catholicism and “YES” to Multifaceted Unity! https://RiteBeyondRome.com

Fr. Reese’s article:  https://www.ncronline.org/news/opinion/more-catholic-pope

Church Unity: NOT about merging disparate factions

Unity is not like a puzzle pieced together.jpg

different puzzle pieces pic.jpg

 

If Cardinal Kasper can say this

about ecumenical unity,

might this wisdom for unity

apply as well WITHIN the Church?

Might this be the wisdom we need
WITHIN our polarized Roman Catholic Church?

Cardinal Kasper.jpg

…a Church polarized by its different interpretations of
the Second Vatican Council

…a Church polarized between

those who hold minimum assent to the Council
and
those who see Vatican II as whole new direction for the Church?

Continue reading

Hope for the Church: Young adults from all over the world at Vatican Seminar talk freely!

“They did not hesitate to challenge the academic presenters or to raise the stakes by freely expressing their views during the debates.

In fact, they even protested when the presentations of the experts exceeded the time limit and ate into their precious discussion time.

They also criticized the Vatican survey addressed to young people which was considered to be too long or poorly translated.

‘The pope asked us to ‘make chaos,’ that’s precisely what we’re doing,’ said Lucas Barboza with a smile.”

VIEW short VIDEO snippets of their discussions on the link below

via Young people make waves at Synod meeting – La Croix International

La Eucaristía: Mi pan roto

(Abajo está la traducción de  Eucharist: My Bread Broken on this website.)

“Si no dejas que se rompa tu pan para que bendiga
y alimente a otros, no habrá vida en ti.”
Cuando esto dijo, los demás se alejaron.

Todos quieren una vida mejor,
más vida, y más grandiosa que la dada.

¿Dónde está el punto? ¿Existe tal cosa?
¿Dónde está el punto? ¿Quiero ir ahí?

MI pan, MI todo,
Todo lo que me es caro,
¿Debo dejar que se rompa?
¿Cómo podría ser?

¿Dejar que se rompa mi pan?
¿para QUÉ?… ¡Me ahogo!.
“Sin pan, sin rotura,
“Moriremos”, dijeron.
Y se alejaron.

¡Oh!, ahí está el roce en mi alma:
MI Pan, MI PAN…
No se debe partir.
Lo quiero como lo quiero
por qué, dónde y cuándo.
Yo lo decido…. y punto.

Debes de tener pan,
tu propio pan. No lo puedes dar,
o deja que se lo lleven.

¿Dejar que se rompa tu pan?
¿Dejar que se ROMPA como se ha de romper?
¿Permitirlo o NO?

¿El Pan roto
no me hará un fracasado?
“¿No acaso lo perdemos de todas maneras?
No nos lo podemos llevar.”
No, pero aun así nos sustenta.

El pan roto, las esperanzas, sueños, ilusiones
y las cosas que casi nunca se cumplen…
porque la vida no se ajusta lo suficiente,
sólo te rodea a ti y a mí.

No puedo partir mi pan…
me lo ha partido la vida.
“Pobre de mí”, el único pan que tenía…

La con-miseración es lo que me hace seguir
seguir y seguir, más y más,
una y otra vez, de vuelta a donde comencé
…¿a menos que parta mi pan?
¿preciosos planes para que las cosas sean lo que deben?
¿lo que yo, tú, ella y él
simplemente deberíamos de ser?

La quieta vocecilla interior
que llama donde sea,
el dónde, el cómo y el por qué carece de razones,
el loco llamado desde un lugar desconocido…

Así que, a menos que parta mi pan,
¿no habrá vida en mí?, ¿en lo que hago?
O sólo sentiré la terrible ausencia de algo…

Me dijeron que sería feliz; que estaría a salvo,
La Certeza y la Seguridad, mis fieles compañeras, merman.
¿Dónde, dónde está el pan que he de partir?

La hermana Lea

(Nuestra más profunda gratitud a Cinthia De Gortari por su fina traducción profesional de este poema.)

 

 

 

 

Theological Differences between Catholic Rites?

Theological Differences
(Excerpt below from from:  Doctrine | From East to West)

Is it true that the Eastern Catholic Churches are allowed to have different theological expressions? If so what does it involve?

This certainly is true. The Eastern Catholic Churches are not only “allowed” but are actively encouraged to cultivate their own distinctive theological expressions.

 

Eastern Catholics, while fully Catholic and in communion with the Pope, differ in more ways than just liturgy. We also possess a unique spiritual tradition, as well as a unique theological approach. While we agree with the Latin Church on fundamental matters of doctrine, we approach doctrine in a very different way – from the Eastern perspective. While the Western Church has traditionally formulated doctrine in terms of scholastic Latin theology, we rely almost exclusively on the theology of the Eastern Church Fathers. This difference, rather than rupturing the unity of the Church, further expresses the true UNIVERSALITY of Christ’s Church.

 

This is authoritatively taught by the Second Vatican Council:

“All in the Church must preserve unity in essentials. But let all, according to the gifts they have received enjoy a proper freedom, in their various forms of spiritual life and discipline, in-their different liturgical rites, and even in their theological elaborations of revealed truth,” (UNITATIS REDINTEGRATIO, no. 4).

Excerpt above from Doctrine | From East to West

Certainly Opus Dei, as the first Roman prelature approved by the Vatican, has different theological perspectives on Vatican II than traditional Roman Rite/Church theology.

Given the above, it should be perfectly reasonable that a Vatican II Rite/Church with its different theological perspectives can co-exist with the 22 other non-Roman Rites/Churches in union with Rome.